incidentalcomics:

Creative Thinking


So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPSHow to generate a map in Photoshop (video)How to create (mountain) brushes (video)How to create trees (video)How to create mountains and hills (video)How to create swamps and deserts (video) Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2) Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4) 
CITIESCity Map GeneratorClevergirlhelps’ Brilliant Post on City PlanningThewritingcafe’s Brilliant Post on City PlanningStreets VS MonumentsHow to create a grid in PhotoshopCity BrushesCities to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)MISC.Ship PlansHow Geography Affects ClimateHow Streets Evolve as Cities GrowHistory of Building MaterialsClimatesR. Steves’ Europe (Videos) NEED A NAME? Location and Setting name generatorPirate Ship name generatorShip name generator

So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPS
How to generate a map in Photoshop (video)
How to create (mountain) brushes 
(video)
How to create trees 
(video)
How to create mountains and hills 
(video)
How to create swamps and deserts 
(video)
Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2)
Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)
Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources
World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)

(via clevergirlhelps)

susie-c:

When people tell me they admire my freelance career, when they tell me it must be nice to sleep in, when they then break eye contact when I tell them how much I am paid, when I am sending a fourth follow-up email to an editor regarding that check, you know, that one you said was in the mail a month ago, this is what I think about:

susie-c:

When people tell me they admire my freelance career, when they tell me it must be nice to sleep in, when they then break eye contact when I tell them how much I am paid, when I am sending a fourth follow-up email to an editor regarding that check, you know, that one you said was in the mail a month ago, this is what I think about:

(via mollycrabapple)

gothiccharmschool:

I need this painted on one of my walls. 

gothiccharmschool:

I need this painted on one of my walls. 

(via nudityandnerdery)

nedhepburn:

nevver:

 Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

‘Cannery Row’ is one of the best books, and ‘Of Mice & Men’ can make a grown man cry. Steinbeck was a legend. Also; the third point here is vital, stellar advice.

nedhepburn:

nevver:

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

‘Cannery Row’ is one of the best books, and ‘Of Mice & Men’ can make a grown man cry. Steinbeck was a legend. Also; the third point here is vital, stellar advice.

(via nudityandnerdery)

You know that tired adage “write what you know”?

delgrosso:

It’s utter crap. Forget it.

At the very least, outgrow it.

Write what you want to know.

Confront the questions and puzzles and secrets and I-wonder-hows and what-ifs that itch at the back of your brain late at night, and make up the answers. Just make them up. Then write the living fuck out of them.